I’ve been extremely busy, so no time to post. I scanned more photos. Most are of me; my apologies to the world at large.

Most people don’t know that UK citizens don’t carry ID cards or cédulas. It is an issue that has become a source of endless debate. During the War, ID cards were issued and continued to be used after the War ended.  This is the one my parents were given for me. I have no idea when they were scrapped.

I believe this is me, with Dad and Tom and Ethel. It could be St. James Park.

I believe this is at Epsom race course on Derby Day. The Derby was – still is – a VBD (very big deal). That was where a suffragette was killed when she threw herself under the King’s Horse in 1913. You can read about Mrs Pankhurst and the struggle for the enfranchisement of women here. For those of you who are not familiar with the story, it’s a very interesting and important part of British social history in the 20th century.

This is me with Peter Weeks. The Weeks’ lived on the ground floor of the flats and our two families were close. I really liked Peter’s mum and dad, especially his mum, Lil. She was the salt-of-the-earth type of Cockney woman you see in films. Warm and big-hearted.

In the flat next to them lived an old lady who dressed like Mary Poppins. When I was small, there were still plenty of people around who were born in the Victorian era. Most of us continue to use the clothes of our youth as we grow older. So it was not uncommon to see men of a certain class wearing detachable, starched collars, for example.

This is the letter Mum received telling her I could start school. It was normal for kids to start at 5 years of age,  some as young as 4 1/2.

This looks like my first school photo. When I started the new school year in September, I only lasted a few weeks. The hospital informed Mum and Dad that I needed to be admitted to treat my leg. It was goodbye to school for a whole year.

I’m a bit older in this one.

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